Patrick Iturra is Back (2019)

I return to the Social Networks: (English Subtitles)

Greetings from El Mirage, CA. This time with my son, driving  at more than 150 mph (240 kph) that was exciting.

I announce that I will return with our Online meetings with the entire Financial Education Team. Stay in Contact.

Video: El Mirage, CA. Car: Lamborghini Huracan Music: Matthew Iturra: https://soundcloud.com/matthew-iturra/imploded

10 Cryptocurrences To Watch In 2019

Earlier this month, arguably the biggest blockchain week in the world kicked off in New York City with CoinDesk’s Consensus event. A previous interview that covered blockchain technology led to a deeper look at the technologies, founders, and companies that are emerging in the industry.

While some of the best projects on display were infrastructure-related, like public blockchains, others were more focused on ancillary services. The teams of these innovative blockchain startups are global, cutting-edge and typically include early blockchain adopters as founders.

KaratGoldCoin was named by Forbes magazine in the top 10. The list shows the 10 companies that work to make Cryptocurrencies more accessible, prominent and general. KaratGoldCoin (KBC) less than 1 year after its launch, It offers something unique with the potential to disrupt traditional industries, as well as get the support of legitimate entities. Based in Germany, Karatbars International GmbH is the parent company of KaratGold Coin and a robust gold-based ecosystem of cross-border blockchain solutions.

The 10 companies: Continue Full Article Forbes Magazine

REGISTER HERE

Why Bill Gates So Successful?

7 Key Habits, Practices, and Experiences

It was 15 years ago today that Bill Gates stepped down as CEO of Microsoft.

While he stayed involved as chairman and chief software architect, it was the start of his major life transition. Here are seven keys to his success–taken from the history of his life and applied to one endeavor after another.

1. Get in early–and learn.

I don’t know if there are shortcuts in life, but there are certainly head starts.

Gates had a big one. In 1969, when he was in eighth grade–when very few schools had any kind of computer system–his school bought an early machine along with blocks of processing time. Gates was excused from regular math classes to learn to program, and became enthralled with it. His first computer program: a tic-tac-toe program.

2. Seek forgiveness, not permission.

Too many people fail to succeed because they hold themselves back. Whether it was youthful folly or instinct, Gates didn’t fall into this category.

As an early example–that computer in eighth grade? When the school’s funds eventually ran out, Gates (with his friend Paul Allen and other students) exploited bugs to obtain free computer time. When they were caught, he and the others traded their bug-finding ability for more free computer time.

3. Value your work.

Another big problem many people have–they are afraid to ask for money. Here again, Gates never had that problem. At age 14, he was writing code for a local company’s payroll program; by age 17, he and Allen launched a company that used an early computer program to help count road traffic.

Gates also pushed to get paid during the 1970s, when business was seen as “square” to put it lightly. After he realized that computer amateurs were using pirated versions of his software, at 21, he wrote an “Open Letter to Hobbyists” telling them to “pay up” so he could “hire 10 programmers and deluge the hobby market with good software.”

4. Learning matters more than school.

Gates was a good student–he scored almost perfectly on the SAT–and he was from a family that valued education. He enrolled at Harvard at 17, but didn’t declare a major and instead spent his time using Harvard’s computers.

By his second year, however, Gates dropped out of Harvard to start a company with his high school friend, Allen–and begin his real education.

5. When you’re in charge, take charge.

It’s funny how perceptions change, but when he was running Microsoft, Gates had a reputation as a difficult, extremely competitive boss. Much like his contemporary Steve Jobs, descriptions of his reaction to employees he disagreed with in meetings were harsh. One described Gates’s criticism as “devastating.”

At the same time though, he took responsibility. During the first five years, when he was overseeing all of the business aspects of the company, he also oversaw (and often rewrote) every line of code in the company’s products. If you’re old enough to have used MS-DOS or the original version of Windows, you’ve used a product Gates helped code.

6. Be the guy who predicts the future.

Obviously easier said than done, but Gates saw the future first at several key moments. One of them–and this is a classic story–came in 1980, when he negotiated a deal to license the DOS operating system to IBM for a low $50,000, but had the foresight not transfer the copyright. As a result, Microsoft was able to license the OS to other vendors who cloned IBM’s machine, thus making a much bigger and more profitable market for his company.

More chillingly: Gates has said recently he’s concerned about the threats of super-intelligent machines on humanity. Let’s hope he’s not seeing this prediction as clearly.

7. Take on a big enough mission.

In some ways this should be the first item on the list, as truly successful people first choose endeavors worthy of their time.

In Gates’s case, fast-forward to the 2000s, after he transitioned out of Microsoft and became a full-time philanthropist. Using the examples of John Rockefeller and Andrew Carnegie (and the mentorship of Warren Buffett), Gates and his wife, Melinda Gates, are among America’s most generous philanthropists, focusing on “big problems” that they believe governments around the world are incapable of solving.

BY BILL MURPHY JR.

Executive editor, TheMid.com, and founder, ProGhostwriters.com

 

Massive Market Divergence

This is one of the most concerning data points for today’s stock markets: decreasing volume. This is happening even while markets are levitated by Federal Reserve stimulus and negative interest rates. By Dan Rubock

Dow Jones 1

This is Maloney’s thoughts: “This is not a healthy market. This means that less and less of the real investors are in there, and more and more of this is black box trading. The problem with that is that when the markets change every black box is going to be selling at once, so what is being set up here is probably the biggest market crash in history.”
He then goes on to show the same divergence in broader market measurements via the S&P 500 and finally the Wilshire 5000:

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Watch the accompanying video for all the details, Maloney holds no punches as to the levity of what he sees coming…

..Once that breaks, we’re going to see pretty much a different world I think.”

Dow Sell Off – Massive Market Divergence In 3 Charts  by Mike Maloney  

How you can have your own Gold Reserve Account? just click HERE (go to Registration-become-a-customer) for more information go to CONTACT 

Let us know what you think in the comments section below.

Mortgage Crisis 2.0

In this episode of the Keiser Report, Max Keiser and Stacy Herbert discuss the impending second wave of the lastest mortgage crisis, this time due to Helocs (Home equity lines of credit) and HAMP (Home Affordable Modification Program) interest rate resets. In the second half, Max interviews Aaron Krowne on the true state of the housing market across America – from home ownership rates to mortgage arrears.

In 2008, the nation entered into a financial crisis widely believed to have been caused by excesses in the residential mortgage industry. By 2010, the nation thought it had put in place a series of measures that not only would resolve the crisis but would insure that it never happened again. Yet, here we are in 2015 looking at another potential mortgage crisis. Only this time it is different. In 2008, funds flowed in waves into the mortgage industry. In 2015, it appears the funds are drying up.

BKFSFeb2015
Gold Spot Price

If we remember what the price of gold was back to 2001, US$271 per oz, to the end of the the best world economic era, (2008) the gold price went up to US$872 for the same ounce. If we are in the middle of another mortgage crisis, what do you have to do?  Learn more [Should you buying gold?]

gold-spot-price-2001-2013

What are you going to do?

Let me suggest a simple strategy: exchange your money for gold, but more simple, start with 1 gram at the time, no investments, no ETF and no risk.

For more information contact HERE

Social Security Disability Fund Has Two Years Left

People tend to think of their Social Security benefits as an actual account, in their name, which contains cash or investments. In reality, the Social Security trust fund contains nothing more than IOUs that have no value beyond a promise to impose higher taxes on future workers. The annual surpluses that many thought were being used to build up a reserve for Baby Boomers have been spent on other government programs or to reduce government debt.

Social Security has been spending more than it has been taking in since 2010, and that imbalance is expected to worsen

SSA_TrustFund_Ratios_800px
Source: Social Security and Medicare Boards of Trustees.

Time is running out on the Social Security Disability Insurance program (SSDI).

Unless Washington acts, it will be depleted by late 2016, according to Social Security and Medicare trustees.  Its latest report concludes that SSDI “satisfies neither the Trustees’ long-range test of close actuarial balance nor their short-range test of financial adequacy and faces the most immediate financing shortfall of any” of the entitlement programs.

The trustees’ report finds that two other major entitlement programs remain in bad financial shape.

Unless it’s reformed, starting in 2033, Social Security will be unable to make full payments to recipients. From then on, it will only be able to pay “about three-quarters of scheduled benefits.”

The bottom line is:

Where do your savings for your retirement plans go? Have you ever questioned that? It’s time to take control of your future.  Discover the secrets that allows you to unlock immense earnings during the greatest wealth transfer in history. 

The Wealth Transfer  

Karatbars International GmbH for contact click HERE 

Source: Social Security and Medicare Boards of Trustees and U.S Chamber of Commerce

Planet Earth is You

The following video was created to raise your awareness on the conservation of our planet. But sometimes we simply see, share, or just talk about these kind of videos on social networks, but a few actually take action to help others. Why do the majority of people feel they cannot help? Because most do not have extra money or time. Imagine helping people while simultaneously building your own wealth?

Do you want to be a part of those “few” that make the difference in our world? Imagine with just €50 / US$65 per week, per month or per year, on your on time, you can exchange your worthless Fiat money [Commodity money vs Fiat money]  with a superior currency, and help children every time you make this currency exchange in third world poverty.

You can buy as many gold as you want and you will also help as many kids as you want with providing them with food, education and shelter.

For the first time, here is your opportunity to build your wealth and create change for the kids of  Africa

Planet Earth is You
4 Minutes That Will Change Your Life Don’t let your INDIFFERENCE take over you.
SHARE THIS RIGHT NOW! There’s still time.

 

Take real action, no more “shares” and “Likes” and you keep your gold.  Just do it, open a free account and increase your wealth. Be smart in your financial habit. Register at karatbars International.

More information about Voice of Africa

For contact, click HERE.  For more information about Karatbars go at The New Global Currency

10 Ways Rich People Think Differently

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Microsoft cofounder and chairman Bill Gates, who is consistently ranked as one of the richest people in the world, speaks at the 2013 Microsoft shareholders meeting.

If you ask Thomas Corley, being rich has very little to do with luck and everything to do with habits.
Corley, who spent five years monitoring and analyzing the daily activities and habits of people both wealthy and living in poverty (233 wealthy and 128 poor, specifically), isolated what he calls “rich habits” — and many of them are simply patterns of thought.

“I found in my research that wealthy people are by and large optimists,” he says. “They practice gratitude and look at happiness like a habit.”

Corley, who presents and explains many of his findings in his book “Rich Habits: The Daily Success Habits Of Wealthy Individuals” and on his website, defines “rich people” as those with an annual income of $160,000 or more and a liquid net worth of $3.2 million or more, and “poor people” as those with an annual income of $35,000 or less and a liquid net worth of $5,000 or less.

Here are 10 ways Corley found that rich people think differently, based on statements with which they identify.

habits exercise

1. Rich people believe their habits have a major impact on their lives.
“Daily habits are critical to financial success in life.”
Rich people who agree: 52%
Poor people who agree: 3%

Wealthy people think that bad habits create detrimental luck and that good habits create “opportunity luck,” meaning they create the opportunities for people to make their own luck. “When I looked at luck,” Corley remembers, “a lot of rich people said they were lucky and a lot of poor people said they were unlucky.”

2. Rich people believe in the American dream.
“The American dream is no longer possible.”
Rich people who agree: 2%
Poor people who agree: 87%

“The American Dream is the idea of unlimited potential, that you can make it on your own,” says Corley. In his study, the vast majority of rich people believed that wealth is a big part of the American dream (94%), and that the dream is still possible.

3. Rich people value relationships for professional and personal growth.

“Relationships are critical to financial success.”
Rich people who agree: 88%
Poor people who agree: 17%

Not only do rich people feel that their relationships are critical to their success, but they put a lot of effort into maintaining them, making a habit of calling up contacts to congratulate them on life events, wish them a happy birthday, or reaching out just to say hello. “When I applied the hello calls and the life event calls to my own life,” recalls Corley, “I ended up making another $60,000 as a result.”

habits of wealthy people

4. Rich people love meeting new people.
“I love meeting new people.”
Rich people who agree: 68%
Poor people who agree: 11%

Hand in hand with valuing relationships comes making new ones. Rich people both love meeting new people and believe that being liked is important to financial success (in fact, it’s a whopping 95% that believe in the power of likability, compared to 9% of poor people).

5. Rich people think that saving is hugely important.
“Saving money is critical to financial success.”
Rich people who agree: 88%
Poor people who agree: 52%

“Being wealthy is not just making a lot of money,” explains Corley. “It’s saving a lot, and accumulating wealth. Many of the people I studied aren’t wealthy because they made a lot, but because they saved a lot.” He’s trying to instill what he calls the 80/20 rule in his own children: Save 20% of your income while living on 80%.

Gold savings_patrickiturra.com

6. Rich people feel that they determine their path in life.
“I believe in fate.”
Rich people who agree: 10%
Poor people who agree: 90%

Poor people are significantly more likely to believe that genetics are important to becoming wealthy, and significantly less likely to believe that they’re the cause of their own financial status in life. “Most of the wealthy people I talked to were businesspeople who weren’t always wealthy,” Corley explains, “but they had this attitude that they could do anything.”

7. Rich people value creativity over intelligence.
“Creativity is critical to financial success.”
Rich people who agree: 75%
Poor people who agree: 11%

While rich people are more likely to believe that creativity influences success, poor people are more likely to think that being “intellectually gifted” is critical. They’re also more likely to believe that wealth is usually accidental. “If you look at my stats, you’ll find that a lot of wealthy people were C students,” says Corley. “There’s more to wealth than just being smart.”

Richard-Branson

8. Rich people enjoy their jobs.
“I like (or liked) what I do for a living.”
Rich people who agree: 85%
Poor people who agree: 2%

“Many of the wealthy in my study loved their job — it’s not an accident,” says Corley. In fact, 86% of the wealthy worked an average of 50 hours or more per week (compared to 43% of the poor), and 81% say they do more than their job requires (versus 17%). Corley says it’s related to the idea of creativity being important to financial success: “These people found a creative pursuit that could turn into monetary value. When you engage in a creative pursuit that can make money, the rewards are often obscene.”

9. Rich people believe that their health influences their success.
“Good health is critical to financial success.”
Rich people who agree: 85%
Poor people who agree: 13%

“One of the individuals in my study told me ‘I can’t make money in a hospital bed,'” Corley remembers. “Wealthy people think that being healthy means fewer sick days, which translates into more productivity and more money.”

rich people planing

10. Rich people are willing to take risks.
“I’ve taken a risk in search of wealth.”
Rich people who agree: 63%
Poor people who agree: 6%

“A lot of the wealthy people in the study were business owners who started their own businesses,” Corley explains. “They became successes because they were master self-educators who learned from the school of hard knocks.” In fact, 27% of the wealthy people in Corley’s study admit they’ve failed at least once in life or in business, compared with 2% of the poor. “Failure is like scar tissue on the brain,” Corley says. “The lessons last forever.”

I found that rich people think differently about assets and liability  Learn more on how you can Build Your True Wealth

ASLO SEE: 9 Things Rich People Do Differently Every Day

Source: Business Insider